Tuesday, May 16, 2017

Kitchen Experiment: How Wild Salmon Differs From Farmed Salmon and the Best Way to Cook It

wild caught salmon compared to farmed salmon

Most home cooks pay close attention to internal temperature when cooking a steak, where know just five degrees means the difference between rare, and medium rare. But few people pay that much attention when dealing with fish, which is really too bad, because even fatty fish like Salmon, can go from tender and moist to chalky, and dry in a flash.

The Experiment

wild vs farmed salmon comparedIn our kitchen, we used an instant read, digital thermometer to tell when Salmon is done. And we’ve always preferred it cooked to 125 degrees, that the ideal balance of firm, yet silky flesh.

The majority of salmon we cook is farmed atlantic, but as we’ve cooked more wild species, we started to wonder if 125 was maybe a bit too high. To find out, we bought multiple filets of the foremost common species of wild pacific salmon. King, also known as Chinook, Sockeye, Coho, and Chum. We cooked samples of each to both 120 degrees, and 125 degrees sou vide, or sealed in a plastic bag, and cooked in a temperature controlled water bath. We also did the same for samples of farmed atlantic salmon.

We then asked tasters, blind to the differences in internal temperature, to pick which sample had the best texture. Everyone preferred the Coho, Sockeye, and Chum samples cooked to 120 degrees. And the farmed atlantic, cooked to 125. While a few folks preferred the King sample at 125 degrees, the majority preferred 120. These results may sound surprising. After all, salmon is salmon right? Well, not exactly.

Conclusion

salmon filletsIt turns out that farmed atlantic salmon differs in two important ways, from the half dozen commercial wild varieties caught in the Pacific ocean. One, due to their sedentary life, the collagen protein in farmed atlantic salmon contains less chemical cross links, than in wild varieties, which translates into softer flesh. And two, farmed atlantic salmon contains more fat than any wild variety, and up to four times as much fat, as the leaner species. We know that fat provides the perception of juiciness when cooked.

So, with naturally firmer flesh, and less fat to provide lubrication, wild salmon can have the texture of overcooked fish, even at 125 degrees. By cooking wild salmon to just 120 degrees, the muscle fibers contract less, and stay moist and tender.

The post Kitchen Experiment: How Wild Salmon Differs From Farmed Salmon and the Best Way to Cook It appeared first on Miss Mamies Cupcakes.



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